Garden soil

Why use biochar in garden soils?

Many of the substrates used in horticulture have a negative impact on the environmental and climate during their degradation, production and transportation. Biochar, on the other hand, can be produced from local residues. Furthermore, it is estimated that about half of the carbon remains in biochar after 150 – 5,000 years, which means that biochar is to be considered a carbon sink from a climate perspective.

WHAT WE DO IN THE PROJECT REST TILL BÄST

Within Rest till Bäst, we are conducting a series of experiments with the aim of mapping the effects of mixing biochar into different types of growing substrates (including peat, peat and bark humus, macadam and various compost mixtures) in small-scale lettuce plantings. The biochar used has been produced from various types of residues and has different pH values. The experiments began in the summer of 2018. The results show a very good lettuce growth in non-fertilised peat that has been mixed with 25 per cent and 33 per cent nutrient-rich (complete fertiliser) biochar with a high pH (above 8.5) respectively.  The effect on lettuce growth produced by biochar with a lower pH, which is mixed into other types of soil, will be tested in the summer of 2019. 

COMMITTED PROJECT PARTNERS

CONTACT

Markus Paulsson
markus.paulsson@lund.se
+46 (0) 46-359 53 36
City of Lund, City Office
221 00 Lund, Sweden

REST TILL BÄST

Rest till Bäst is a Vinnova-funded project whose purpose is to develop solutions for managing society’s organic residues and create a much needed beneficial product, while at the same time minimising environmental and climate impact.